The Merging of Two Worlds
  Roy E. Bourque      
Mystery of the split brain

The thought activity that occurs in the left brain hemisphere is math, language, writing, science, and logic, all roots of the scientific method. The thought activity that occurs in the right brain hemisphere is music, art, dance, sculpture, perception, and fantasy, all roots of associative thinking. It is these two types of thinking that are the root cause of why science and religion can't seem to come to terms with each other.

The right brain sees the forces of creation as a creator, hence the term Supreme Being. The left brain sees the forces of creation as mathematical models. They are both looking at the same thing, but they see it entirely differently because they are using different brain functions to comprehend it.

Science deals with tangible issues, things with physical parameters, things that can be directly measured. Science is concerned with the structural buildings blocks of the cosmos, along with the laws, processes, and forces involved in how these building blocks interact and evolve over time. The information of science is presented in a mathematical language. The theories of science are all generated through a logical progression. This is clearly a left brain–oriented subject.

The history of religion, on the other hand, exposes a very different picture of early cultures. Here we find their temples adorned in art and sculpture. We find their writing rich in symbolism and pictographs. We find their educational system rooted in mythology. Clearly these are all right brain–dominated functions. Religion deals with intangible issues involving mental growth and development, social interaction, emotion, mystical experience, morality, and ethics. As such, religion incorporates allegories, parables, and myths, all right-brain associations pertaining to spiritual and/or matters that directly concern the thought processes. The transition from carnal to spiritual (or from the animal nature to fully evolved human) has been the underlying basis of religious literature.

Religious writings must be analyzed from an associative point of view, whereas, science must be analyzed from a logical point of view, because that’s where they originated from. Once you understand that distinction, only then you can begin to look for what is common.

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